#W724AUSTRALIA/
Wandaway/Dhuwa
Aboriginal painting in ochre, charcoal and kaolin with natural binder.
by Djutadjuta Munungurr Djapu.
Acquired personally at Nambara Art Center, Nhulunbuy, NT, Australia, ca. 1990
38" x 19"

Portraying sacred waterholes in traditional rarrk and iconography, on bark from a eucalyptus tree, secured by sticks on each end.

"The Djan'kawu brother and two sisters travelled from spirit island Burralku, to Yalangbara on the east of Arnhemland, then North and West to Ramingining. As they traveled they marked the country, leaving behind waterholes, species, sites and sacred objects. The Djank'kawu made the country rich and fertile."

Djutadjuta Mununggurr
(b. ca.1935 - d.1999) is well-known to knowledgeble followers of Australian Aboriginal "bark" art. He was a winner of top honors in the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art Award and is recognized as mastering the fine cross-hatching of Yirrkala people. His work also benefited from the help with the fine cross-hatching rrark by his wife, Nonggirrnga Marawili.
This work was done ca. 1989

Estimated Value FOB Fort Myers. FL US$1,500.00
exclusive of delivery cost.

Because of the uniqueness, cultural sensitivity and irreplaceable nature of this work of art, if you are interested in acquiring it, please contact us at Sanibelart@gmail.com to discuss payment terms and plans for taking possession of it. (If you live in Florida or plan to visit Southwest Florida, we can arrange pick-up or delivery to you.) Otherwise, shipping will be the buyer's responsibility, although we will happily act as your agent in arranging packing and shipping based on your specifications. After agreeing on details of the transaction, we will send you a Paypal invoice reflecting that agreement.



Australian Aborignal art bark painting gallery
Click to return to Australian
Aboriginal bark painting gallery

 

 

Australian Aboriginal art in the US

TribalWorks Australain Aboriginal art gallery
Fort Myers, FL. 33908
800-305-01855

239-482-7025

(c) 2001-2020 Aboriginals: Art of the First Person