The Australian Gallery: Bark Paintings


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W769 Aboriginal art bark painting by Luke Nganjmirra

Larry Nalorman Aboriginal art painting

W769 - Nganjmirra
K151 - Nalorman
Australian Aboriginal bark painting
W813 Aboriginal Art Bark on Board Painting
Aboriginal bark painting
W950-Nguburru
W813 Yirrkala
W821 - Maymuru

Australian Aboriginal bark painting
Australian Aboriginal bark painting
W752-Djawida
W816-Marika
W758 - Mardday
Aboriginal art bark painting by Munumgirr
Australian Aboriginal bark painting
Australian Aboriginal bark painting
W724-Munumgurr
CY76 - Tiwi
W818 - Gumana
Please note actual dimensions of these paintings, which are shown on the close-up pages. Thumbnail photos can be misinterpreted.
Aboriginal painting by Eddie Blitner
KB58 - Blitner
Aboriginal Carvings Gallery  
There are several styles of bark painting.

The Aboriginal Tiwi people of Melville Island and Bathurst Island, off the northern coast of the Australian mainland, have a distinctive decorative style, which developed in isolation from mainland Australian Aboriginal art.

It appears in their bark paintings and their other works of art and features boldly colored geometric designs. These include carved birds and poles from the Pukumani ceremony.

Arnhemland in Australia's Northern Territory includes works of a different style from several communities and peoples.

The Kunwinjku people of Oenpelli have a technique known as the x-ray style. Maningrida and Milingimbi settlements each have their own distinctive styles. Yet other styles have their roots in Groote Eylandt, Elcho Island, Ramingining and among the Yirrkala of Nhulunbuy.


Australian Aboriginal Art Buyer's Guide

Fort Myers, FL. 33957
239-482-7025
800-305-0185

 

(c) 2002 - 2012 Aboriginals: Art of the First Person